Samsung Tab S 10.5 – How well does it run emulators?

Samsung Tab S 10.5

NES: Great
Gameboy: Great
SNES: Great
Genesis: Great
Gameboy Advance: Great
N64: Good – the hardware is more than enough to run the games, the emulators available are the problem.
Playstation/PSX: Great
NDS: Great
GameCube and above: Poor – games are unplayable. (Emulator problem as much as a hardware problem)

I’ve had my Tab S 10.5 for about three weeks now. I bought it as a replacement for an iPad 3. It’s been rooted and all of the Samsung junk turned off. I use a PS3 controller via the Sixaxis app.

I’m very happy with the tablet as a tablet. As an emulator machine its really good. My only complaint is the same complaint I have with emulation on any tablet; how do you hold the tablet and the controller at the same time? I tried an Ipega 9023 telescopic controller, the mount was good, but the controller had poor button placement for my hands. That made the controller difficult to use. Next I tried to DIY solution using a Gameklip and a car tablet mount. The Tab S was too heavy for the Gameklip. I end up propping the Tab S up via its case and setting it on a lap desk. This works, but I would much rather to have it mounted on the controller.

Having such a large screen makes emulating Nintendo DS games much more enjoyable than on a Shield Portable or phone. You have plenty of room to see both screens at the same time. The downside of the big screen is that games will look bad unless you apply a filter. Once you apply some HQ filters though, the games look amazing.

My favorite emulation device is still the NVIDIA Shield Portable, if for no other reason than the screen is mounted over the controller. The Shield is pretty dedicated to one task though.The Tab S is a great choice when you need a tablet but you also want to play some games. The screen on the Tab S is amazing and when you use emulators that support filters, your old games never looked better.

Since the Tab S 8.4 has the same hardware as the Tab S 10.5, all of the above should equally apply to it.

NVIDIA Shield Tablet – How well does it run emulators?

NES: Great
Gameboy: Great
SNES: Great
Genesis: Great
Gameboy Advance: Great
N64: Good – the Shield hardware is more than enough to run the games, the emulators available are the problem.
Playstation/PSX: Great
NDS: Great
GameCube and above: Poor – games are unplayable. (Emulator problem as much as a hardware problem)

There is one problem with the Shield Tablet that makes it a poor choice as a hand held emulator console, the battery life. I was lucky to get four hours of battery browsing the web and playing videos. Using it to play Chrono Trigger for the SNES got me about three hours of battery. The advertised battery life is 6-8 hours. Even more disappointing was that I could plug the charger in and the battery would still drain just from browsing the web/playing YouTube. I thought that my device had a hardware defect and sent it back, the new device had the same problem. If you read the NVIDIA forums, this is apparently a ‘thing’ with the Shield Tablets.

Considering how great the Shield Portable is its such a shame the tablet has these power problems. This one problem ruined an otherwise perfect tablet for me. Very disappointing.

NVIDIA Shield Portable – How well does it run emulators?

NVIDIA Shield Portable

Below is my quickie rundown of how well the NVIDIA Shield Portable emulates classic consoles.

NES: Great
Gameboy: Great
SNES: Great
Genesis: Great
Gameboy Advance: Great
N64: Good – the Shield hardware is more than enough to run the games, the emulators available are the problem.
Playstation/PSX: Great
NDS: Good. Some lag in parts, but nothing too bad.
GameCube and above: Poor – games are unplayable

tl;dr: The Shield Portable is best handheld emulator console out there.

Cheap DIY treadmill desk that won’t murder your wrists.

I sit at a computer the better part of my day. I try to mitigate this some by walking around (pacing) while I’m on the phone. On days I work I’m lucky to get in 7,500 steps, this is below the 10,000 generally considered to be healthy.

One day I stumbled across an article about a DIY treadmill desk, essentially you bungie cord a board to your treadmill, set your laptop on it, and then walk and work. That piqued my interest, but my first thought was that it would kill my wrists. If I don’t keep my hand level with my wrist/arm I feel it very quickly. I’m well aware of the permanent damage you can do to yourself by keeping poor wrist posture.

You can buy some really good looking treadmill desks that can be adjusted up and down, but its a large expense for something I wasn’t sure I would even be able to use. I was on the fence if I could even walk and type at the same time.

I wanted something I could try out cheaply. I built a reasonable facsimile for about $50.

My idea was this:

  • Use a TV wall mount to attach a spare monitor to the wall in front of the treadmill
  • Set my laptop on a table next to the treadmill.
  • Build a raised desk attached to the treadmill’s rails. This would be where the keyboard and mouse would sit.

Parts I had to buy:

Total: $51.50

Parts I already had:

  • Treadmill
  • laptop
  • extra monitor
  • keyboard
  • mouse and pad
  • build tools and fasteners
  • table to put laptop on

Building it

The general idea is that you’re going cut one of the shelf boards into legs and attach them to the intact board.

The top of the desk should be level with your elbow when held at your side. I stood on the treadmill and measured the difference between my elbow and the top of the rail, this was 7.5 inches. My U-bolts were 2.5 inches wide. To give myself some room I took the elbow measurement and added 4 inches (U-bolts size plus extra) to it. 11.5 inches was the length of my desk legs.

After cutting the legs I needed to know where to drill holes for the U-bolts to go. I measured from the top of the leg down 7.5 inches and made a mark, this was where I needed to drill for the first hole for the U-bolt.

I assembled the desk in place. I attached the legs to the treadmill with the U-bolts, and then placed the remaining board on top and screwed it into the legs.

My last step was mounting the monitor to the wall. I followed the instructions that came with the mount. You’ll want the monitor to be positioned in such away that you don’t have to look up or down to see it.

Below is what it looks like completed. Not the prettiest project I’ve ever done, but functional. Fortunately I work at home and no one ever sees my office.

20141023_215456727_iOS20141023_215517791_iOS desk2

How does it work?

Surprisingly well. I set the treadmill to 1.6 MPH. I’m able to walk and type and use the mouse OK. Walking doesn’t mess with my concentration. I gave Kerbal Space Program, Team Fortress, and DOTA a try, no problems at all. I did have to train myself a bit not to step off of the treadmill when circle strafing in Team Fortress.. I would naturally step to the side and eventually make it off of the treadmill.

I don’t use the treadmill desk full time. I have a normal sit down desk that I use for the majority of the day. I use the walking desk for an hour or so to make sure I meet my 10,000 step goal for the day. I do roughly 1,000 steps each ten minutes I walk at 1.6 MPH.

Future Improvements/If I did it again

If I had to do it over again I would use actual real solid wood for the desk. It would look better, be stronger, and last much longer. Engineered wood was some good uses, furniture isn’t one of them. Especially furniture built by a guy like me.

I would take off the control console of the treadmill and run all of my wires through the middle of the metal support posts.

I would also think long an hard about a better mounting method than the U-bolts… they’re ugly.

 Three Week Update (11/10/14)

After three weeks I still use the treadmill desk everyday. My goal is to have 10,000 steps walked out before 5PM. This usually results in me walking on the desk for an hour or so starting at 3PM.

I normally walk at 1.6 miles and hour. I can walk at 2.5 miles an hour and still work, but at anything over 1.6 miles an hour I tend to think more about walking than what’s on the monitor.

Instead of continuing to use my laptop, I purchased a 25 feet long HDMI cable and connected the treadmill’s monitor to my office PC. I have a wireless keyboard and mouse, so when I want to walk on the treadmill I just move them over there. This works better as there is no loss of continuity when switching from my usual desk to the treadmill. I also do not have to plug in and unplug my laptop every day.

I also took the time to bundle up all of the cables and hide them. This did a lot for improving the appearance, but I still wouldn’t call the setup an attractive piece of furniture. If the particle board were to deteriorate or I were to break the desk I would definitely spend the money on a commercially made desk for the appearance alone.

What is the best handheld emulator console?

It’s no secret I like old games. At one time or another I’ve used an emulator on every handheld device I can find. Which one do I think is the best?

Sony PSP

If you already have a PSP this is a good choice. PSPs are very easy to load emulators on. They will run consoles up to SNES or GBA just fine. They’ll run PSP games and stream from your PS4 too.

Nintendo 3DS

A 3DS can emulate up to SNES era. It will semi-natively run GBA and DS games. It’ll run 3DS games too. You’ll need to buy a DSTWO flash cartridge though to get everything working. The build quality on the DSTWO carts can be suspect, mine works but is held together with tape. Unless you already have a 3DS I wouldn’t bother.

Android Phones and Tablets

The quality of the emulators for Android is outstanding. You can easily attach purpose made Android controllers or even use a PS3 or XBOX controllers. A two year old Samsung Galaxy S3 will emulate NDS, N64, and PSX games. 

iPhone and iPad

IOS devices will run emulators once jail broken. I wouldn’t recommend it. PITA to jail break and then a PITA if you want to update your phone. There is also a trick wherein you can install and run an emulator if you change the date on your phone every time you load the emulator, again a PITA. (This doesn’t work in the newest IOS version)

Random Chinese Android Consoles

They’re great when they work. The build quality and battery life can be very poor. There are a lot of different devices out there and I’m painting with a wide brush. Unless you can get one for practically free I would stay away.

GCW Zero

The GCW Zero will run anything up the SNES era. The build quality can be iffy at times. The battery life is awesome. If you can find one for under $100 its not a bad choice, though you can find PSPs for under a $100 and the PSP would be a better choice.

NVIDIA Shield Portable

The Shield has all of the good points of an Android phone and a built in controller. It will run any system short of the Game Cube. It’s seriously good.

What do I recommend?

If you have an Android phone made in the last two years, get yourself controller and use it. If you don’t have an Android phone, buy an NVIDIA Shield.

The quality and the ongoing support for emulation on Android is really amazing. The quality of the hardware on most Android phones and definitely on the Shield is excellent.

Cost wise a phone or a Shield are great choices. An NVIDIA Shield portable is $150 at the time this was written. An Android phone is something lots of people already have, you can get yourself setup with controller that attaches to your phone for less than $50. The other devices I mentioned in this post typically start at around $175 and go up from there.

I have an NVIDIA Shield and love it.

pdtk on RedHat Enterprise Linux 7 (RHEL7)

I use pdftk in order to split PDFs into individual files for each page. I recently moved a server to RHEL7 and was kind of disappointed that I couldn’t find it via yum. I tried finding an RPM, I tried an RPM from a previous version, I tried to build from a source RPM, I tried to build from the source, no luck. As with most things I suppose I could keep beating my head against the wall and blow a bunch of time to figure it out, but why bother?

It turns out the ImageMagick’s convert command will split a PDF into individual pages. ImageMagick is easily installable via yum. I don’t believe I’ve seen many Linux systems without it. It also has Window binaries.

Here is the command:

convert -quality 100 -density 200x200 PDF-IN PAGES

Amazon Fire TV NES, SNES, and GBA Emulators

The Amazon Fire TV can run NES, SNES, and GBA games. You can even use the included remote, though the game controller works much better.

I made up a package with a batch script that makes it pretty easy.

Here is how to play NES, SNES, and GBA games on your Amazon Fire TV.

Note: This does not require you to root your Fire TV. You will not lose access to the Amazon interface. Nothing will be removed or change. If in doubt look over the package you download and definitely look over all of the .bat files.

Enable USB Debugging and Find out the IP address of your Fire TV

This steps turns on the features that allow you to remotely install software on your Fire TV.

  1. From the Fire TV Home screen, select Settings
  2. Go to System -> Developer Options
  3. Select ADB Debugging to turn it ON
  4. Go to System -> About -> Network, and take note of the Fire TV’s IP address

(Thanks XBMC Wiki)

Download and Extract my Installer Package

Amazon Fire TV Emulator Package: Download

Once you have it downloaded, unzip it.

Install Emulators and Send Your ROMs to the Amazon Fire TV

Installing the emulators:

  1. Double click on INSTALL-EMULATORS.bat (in the installer package)
  2. When prompted, enter the IP of your Fire TV
  3. You should see the emulators install with a ‘Success’ message

Copying the ROMS:

There are folders for ROMs for each system in the installer package. Copy your ROMs into the folder appropriate for them. If your ROMs are zipped, unzip them. Make sure the NES ROMs have a .nes extension, SNES .smc, and GBA .gba.

To play GBA games you’ll need a GBA bios file. Put it in the ROMS-GBA folder.

Once you have everything in the appropriate folders, double click on INSTALL-ROMS.bat. When prompted, enter the IP of your Fire TV. You should see everything copy over.

If at some point in the future you want to add more ROMs to your Fire TV, just add them into the appropriate folder and double click on INSTALL-ROMS.bat again.

Launch Emulators and Configure 

You should now have your emulators and ROMs installed on the Fire TV. Unfortunately side loaded applications do not appear in the Home screen, you have to launch them via the Settings menu.

  1. From the Fire TV Home screen, select Settings
  2. Select Applications
  3. Find and select the emulator you want. (Nesoid, Snesoid, GameBoid)
  4. Select Launch Application

You will want to go into the settings for the emulator and map the buttons for the remote (or your controller) to the game buttons.

Where to go From Here?

If you’re only using the remote that came with the Fire TV you’ll want to get a real controller. The remote works OK for RPGs and games that don’t require twitchy actions. Amazon sells a very good controller made for the Fire TV. XBOX 360 and PS3 controllers work well too.

The emulators I’ve included are not the best out there. There are some really good commercial Android emulators out there, installing and using them makes for a better experience.

What Exactly does the Installer Package do?

The general idea is that it side loads the emulator’s apk files via winadb. The installer package (if you can call it that) contains a apks for the emulators, winadb, and a couple of .bat files. The .bat files launch winadb with the appropriate commands to connect to the Fire TV and install the emulators. You can easily modify the .bat files to allow you to install other emulators.

ASUS RT-N66U: Other odd system log messages explained

Aside from the, ‘WAN Connection: Ethernet link down.’, message I was seeing in my ASUS RT-N66U system log, there are two other error messages that appear often.

miniupnpd: unsupported NAT-PMP version : 2

This message appears in my log every hour on the hour. As near as I can tell it doesn’t cause any problems with my Internet connection or general network performance. I’ve figured out it only occurs when my wife’s Mac Mini is turned on. The Mac works just fine  during and outside times the error message is being logged. Either Mac OS itself or some program she has is using UPnP in a way the ASUS router doesn’t care for. I don’t have a good answer on this outside of saying it doesn’t seem to affect much.

kernel: eth1: received packet with  own address as source address

I have two access points in my home, both with the same SSID. The first access point is the one built into the ASUS RT-N66U, the second access point is an old Netgear router with everything but the access point functionality turned off.

This error occurs when a client moves from the ASUS RT-N66U to the Netgear access point. The network is general is not affected. The client moving between the two access points will lose some packets. The packet loss isn’t noticeable unless you are looking for it.

 

The one slim wallet to rule them all

After a string of Kickstarter slim front pocket wallets I’ve finally found a replacement for my Dopp Wallet, a Ralph Lauren Silk Tie Card Case.

Problems with the Kickstarter wallets

The biggest problem I had with the Kickstarter wallets was their durability. Each wallet I tried ended up with either frayed cloth or elastic after a few months of use. In comparison my Dopp wallet has been with me since I was a teenager and looks great. A secondary problem, considering I was searching for function, was that they tended to look dorky, I would point out that The Ridge wallet was an exception to the dorkiness.

The Ralph Lauren Silk Tie Card Case

Card case is an apt name for this as there isn’t much room for cash, photos, business cards, or the other things people keep in their wallets. As a guy who only carries a couple of credit cards and IDs its perfect. The wallet is leather with one side covered in silk tie material. It’s small, not much wider than a credit card. The thickness is about three credit cards.

I’ve owned this wallet for about three months now. There is no wear and tear evident. If anything it looks better now as riding around in my pocket has polished the leather a bit.

I’ve not found a thing I don’t like about this wallet.

You can buy the Ralph Lauren Silt Tie Card Case directly from Ralph Lauren.ralph_lauren_wallet

 

 

ASUS RT-N66U – WAN Connection: Ethernet link down.

A few weeks ago I began to have a recurring and incredibly frustrating problem with my Internet connection. Multiple times a day my Internet connection would drop for a couple of minutes at a time. My cable modem would show I had a good link. Upon checking my ASUS RT-N66U router I would see this in the system log:

WAN Connection: Ethernet link down.

Then a few minutes later the connection would come back on its own. I would see this in the log:

WAN Connection: Ethernet link up.

I work from home, mostly using SSH to log into remote servers. My connection would flake out just long enough for my SSH connection to drop. It drove me up the wall.

I did a lot of Google searching and couldn’t find much of anything about the problem. What I did find wasn’t productive.

Going strictly off of the error message I figured I had one of three problems, bad network cable between the router and modem, bad WAN port on the router, or bad WAN port on the modem. I changed network cables with no luck. I replaced my ASUS router with an old Netgear router I had. The problem stopped. I went back to the old cable, still no problem. I put the ASUS router back into play, the problem started again. I knew it had to be something with the ASUS router. I had owned it for too long to send it back for warranty coverage. I also thought it odd that the hardware in the WAN port could be flakey enough to cause an intermittent problem like this while otherwise working fine. I figured it was software related.

In order to simplify things I turned off every feature of the router I didn’t %100 need. Guest wifi network, QoS,  USB support, DDNS, cloud support, and so on and so forth were turned off. I even shut down the second access point I have in my house. After simplifying everything something wonderful happened. The problem stopped. I gave it a few days to be certain and sure enough, no more drops.

I then began to turn on each service again, one per day. When I turned on DDNS via no-ip.com the drops started again within a few hours. I turned off DDNS and the drops stopped. The culprit had been found.

I don’t have a good idea why the DDNS client causes the WAN Ethernet port to drop out. Its some sort of bug in the 3.0.0.4.376_1071 firmware I’m running.

In the end my solution was to leave DDNS turned off in the router and then to install a no-ip.com update client on my computer.

TL;DR

My ASUS RT-N66U router started dropping my Internet connection. It had something to do with updating no-ip.com. Turning off the DDNS client solved the problem.

Update 9/10/14: I switch to the Merlin Firmware and even with DDNS turned on the router has been fine with no drops. That aside the new firmware is working great, all of the features I would expect and I have not noticed any change in my speed.