I sit at a computer the better part of my day. I try to mitigate this some by walking around (pacing) while I’m on the phone. On days I work I’m lucky to get in 7,500 steps, this is below the 10,000 generally considered to be healthy.

One day I stumbled across an article about a DIY treadmill desk, essentially you bungie cord a board to your treadmill, set your laptop on it, and then walk and work. That piqued my interest, but my first thought was that it would kill my wrists. If I don’t keep my hand level with my wrist/arm I feel it very quickly. I’m well aware of the permanent damage you can do to yourself by keeping poor wrist posture.

You can buy some really good looking treadmill desks that can be adjusted up and down, but its a large expense for something I wasn’t sure I would even be able to use. I was on the fence if I could even walk and type at the same time.

I wanted something I could try out cheaply. I built a reasonable facsimile for about $50.

My idea was this:

  • Use a TV wall mount to attach a spare monitor to the wall in front of the treadmill
  • Set my laptop on a table next to the treadmill.
  • Build a raised desk attached to the treadmill’s rails. This would be where the keyboard and mouse would sit.

Parts I had to buy:

Total: $51.50

Parts I already had:

  • Treadmill
  • laptop
  • extra monitor
  • keyboard
  • mouse and pad
  • build tools and fasteners
  • table to put laptop on

Building it

The general idea is that you’re going cut one of the shelf boards into legs and attach them to the intact board.

The top of the desk should be level with your elbow when held at your side. I stood on the treadmill and measured the difference between my elbow and the top of the rail, this was 7.5 inches. My U-bolts were 2.5 inches wide. To give myself some room I took the elbow measurement and added 4 inches (U-bolts size plus extra) to it. 11.5 inches was the length of my desk legs.

After cutting the legs I needed to know where to drill holes for the U-bolts to go. I measured from the top of the leg down 7.5 inches and made a mark, this was where I needed to drill for the first hole for the U-bolt.

I assembled the desk in place. I attached the legs to the treadmill with the U-bolts, and then placed the remaining board on top and screwed it into the legs.

My last step was mounting the monitor to the wall. I followed the instructions that came with the mount. You’ll want the monitor to be positioned in such away that you don’t have to look up or down to see it.

Below is what it looks like completed. Not the prettiest project I’ve ever done, but functional. Fortunately I work at home and no one ever sees my office.

20141023_215456727_iOS20141023_215517791_iOS desk2

How does it work?

Surprisingly well. I set the treadmill to 1.6 MPH. I’m able to walk and type and use the mouse OK. Walking doesn’t mess with my concentration. I gave Kerbal Space Program, Team Fortress, and DOTA a try, no problems at all. I did have to train myself a bit not to step off of the treadmill when circle strafing in Team Fortress.. I would naturally step to the side and eventually make it off of the treadmill.

I don’t use the treadmill desk full time. I have a normal sit down desk that I use for the majority of the day. I use the walking desk for an hour or so to make sure I meet my 10,000 step goal for the day. I do roughly 1,000 steps each ten minutes I walk at 1.6 MPH.

Future Improvements/If I did it again

If I had to do it over again I would use actual real solid wood for the desk. It would look better, be stronger, and last much longer. Engineered wood was some good uses, furniture isn’t one of them. Especially furniture built by a guy like me.

I would take off the control console of the treadmill and run all of my wires through the middle of the metal support posts.

I would also think long an hard about a better mounting method than the U-bolts… they’re ugly.

 Three Week Update (11/10/14)

After three weeks I still use the treadmill desk everyday. My goal is to have 10,000 steps walked out before 5PM. This usually results in me walking on the desk for an hour or so starting at 3PM.

I normally walk at 1.6 miles and hour. I can walk at 2.5 miles an hour and still work, but at anything over 1.6 miles an hour I tend to think more about walking than what’s on the monitor.

Instead of continuing to use my laptop, I purchased a 25 feet long HDMI cable and connected the treadmill’s monitor to my office PC. I have a wireless keyboard and mouse, so when I want to walk on the treadmill I just move them over there. This works better as there is no loss of continuity when switching from my usual desk to the treadmill. I also do not have to plug in and unplug my laptop every day.

I also took the time to bundle up all of the cables and hide them. This did a lot for improving the appearance, but I still wouldn’t call the setup an attractive piece of furniture. If the particle board were to deteriorate or I were to break the desk I would definitely spend the money on a commercially made desk for the appearance alone.

It’s no secret I like old games. At one time or another I’ve used an emulator on every handheld device I can find. Which one do I think is the best?

Sony PSP

If you already have a PSP this is a good choice. PSPs are very easy to load emulators on. They will run consoles up to SNES or GBA just fine. They’ll run PSP games and stream from your PS4 too.

Nintendo 3DS

A 3DS can emulate up to SNES era. It will semi-natively run GBA and DS games. It’ll run 3DS games too. You’ll need to buy a DSTWO flash cartridge though to get everything working. The build quality on the DSTWO carts can be suspect, mine works but is held together with tape. Unless you already have a 3DS I wouldn’t bother.

Android Phones and Tablets

The quality of the emulators for Android is outstanding. You can easily attach purpose made Android controllers or even use a PS3 or XBOX controllers. A two year old Samsung Galaxy S3 will emulate NDS, N64, and PSX games. 

iPhone and iPad

IOS devices will run emulators once jail broken. I wouldn’t recommend it. PITA to jail break and then a PITA if you want to update your phone. There is also a trick wherein you can install and run an emulator if you change the date on your phone every time you load the emulator, again a PITA. (This doesn’t work in the newest IOS version)

Random Chinese Android Consoles

They’re great when they work. The build quality and battery life can be very poor. There are a lot of different devices out there and I’m painting with a wide brush. Unless you can get one for practically free I would stay away.

GCW Zero

The GCW Zero will run anything up the SNES era. The build quality can be iffy at times. The battery life is awesome. If you can find one for under $100 its not a bad choice, though you can find PSPs for under a $100 and the PSP would be a better choice.

NVIDIA Shield Portable

The Shield has all of the good points of an Android phone and a built in controller. It will run any system short of the Game Cube. It’s seriously good.

What do I recommend?

If you have an Android phone made in the last two years, get yourself controller and use it. If you don’t have an Android phone, buy an NVIDIA Shield.

The quality and the ongoing support for emulation on Android is really amazing. The quality of the hardware on most Android phones and definitely on the Shield is excellent.

Cost wise a phone or a Shield are great choices. An NVIDIA Shield portable is $150 at the time this was written. An Android phone is something lots of people already have, you can get yourself setup with controller that attaches to your phone for less than $50. The other devices I mentioned in this post typically start at around $175 and go up from there.

I have an NVIDIA Shield and love it.

I use pdftk in order to split PDFs into individual files for each page. I recently moved a server to RHEL7 and was kind of disappointed that I couldn’t find it via yum. I tried finding an RPM, I tried an RPM from a previous version, I tried to build from a source RPM, I tried to build from the source, no luck. As with most things I suppose I could keep beating my head against the wall and blow a bunch of time to figure it out, but why bother?

It turns out the ImageMagick’s convert command will split a PDF into individual pages. ImageMagick is easily installable via yum. I don’t believe I’ve seen many Linux systems without it. It also has Window binaries.

Here is the command:

convert -quality 100 -density 200x200 PDF-IN PAGES