Game Prince RS-1 Handheld NES Console Review (Obscure Handheld)

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The RS-1 Game Prince is a handheld NES on a chip console with a 2.5 inch back lit LCD.

The Hardware

The Game Prince feels pretty sturdy. I was expecting it to be made of cheap plastic, but not so much. The console’s case is contoured so that it sits in your hand well. It runs on three AAA batteries. There is a headphone jack and volume slider. There is no cartridge slot for games as they are all built in.

The buttons and their layout get interesting. It has a PlayStation style D-PAD. There is no Select button. The A and B buttons are reversed. There is a turbo button you can use to assign a turbo function to A or B. There is a Reset button that allows you to reboot the device, essentially exiting a game and getting back to the game selection menu.

The lack of the select button isn’t a big deal. None of the included games rely on it.

The A and B buttons reversed is an odd thing. It really tripped me up at first, but then I got used to it. It’s not ideal, but it is workable.

The batteries last a long time. I’ve owned my Game Prince (or is it an RS-1?) for about three months now. After about 15 hours of play time I’ve went through one set of batteries and I’m working through the second. There is no battery meter. The use of AAA batteries isn’t a big deal for me as I use rechargeable Ni-MH batteries.

The Games

The Game Prince is advertised as having 152 games built in. Like most NES on a chip systems, this is a stretch. The majority of the games are copies of each other with different names or a single level only. For instance, Hudson’s Adventure Island exists as a full game. Each of the levels for the Adventure Island are also playable as if they are complete games.

The games that are included are a decent mix of early NES titles. Super Mario Bros, Mario Bros, Contra, Mappy, Galaga, Gradius, and the like are well represented. There are no games present that use a battery save feature like the Legend of Zelda, again something typical of a NES on a chip system. There are about 25 actual games.

There are some neat variations of the games though, fast Super Mario Bros. is fun.

The games play very well. No emulation glitches as they games are running on essentially the original hardware they were written for. The sound out of the Game Prince’s speaker is good for what it is. The buttons are responsive.

I purchased my RS-1 Game Prince from AliExpress for $19. For that price it’s definitely worth it just as a bathroom diversion.

Other Thoughts

I’ve been fascinated with NES on a chip systems since the first ones shaped like a N64 controller started appearing around 2004.  Ben Heck turned one into a portable way back when.

The A and B buttons being reversed really seems like an unforgivable sin at first, but I got over it within a few minutes of playing.

Being cheap Chinese crap, the menus on the Game Prince are littered with grammar and translation issues. Prassing start to begin or playing Dongkey Kong always makes me smile.

Game Prince's poorly translated menu

3 comments

  1. “The lack of the select button isn’t a big deal. None of the included games rely on it.”

    That’s not entirely true. At least Batman uses the select button to switch between weapons. Without it, the game isn’t really playable.

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