gameprince

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The RS-1 Game Prince is a handheld NES on a chip console with a 2.5 inch back lit LCD.

The Hardware

The Game Prince feels pretty sturdy. I was expecting it to be made of cheap plastic, but not so much. The console’s case is contoured so that it sits in your hand well. It runs on three AAA batteries. There is a headphone jack and volume slider. There is no cartridge slot for games as they are all built in.

The buttons and their layout get interesting. It has a PlayStation style D-PAD. There is no Select button. The A and B buttons are reversed. There is a turbo button you can use to assign a turbo function to A or B. There is a Reset button that allows you to reboot the device, essentially exiting a game and getting back to the game selection menu.

The lack of the select button isn’t a big deal. None of the included games rely on it.

The A and B buttons reversed is an odd thing. It really tripped me up at first, but then I got used to it. It’s not ideal, but it is workable.

The batteries last a long time. I’ve owned my Game Prince (or is it an RS-1?) for about three months now. After about 15 hours of play time I’ve went through one set of batteries and I’m working through the second. There is no battery meter. The use of AAA batteries isn’t a big deal for me as I use rechargeable Ni-MH batteries.

The Games

The Game Prince is advertised as having 152 games built in. Like most NES on a chip systems, this is a stretch. The majority of the games are copies of each other with different names or a single level only. For instance, Hudson’s Adventure Island exists as a full game. Each of the levels for the Adventure Island are also playable as if they are complete games.

The games that are included are a decent mix of early NES titles. Super Mario Bros, Mario Bros, Contra, Mappy, Galaga, Gradius, and the like are well represented. There are no games present that use a battery save feature like the Legend of Zelda, again something typical of a NES on a chip system. There are about 25 actual games.

There are some neat variations of the games though, fast Super Mario Bros. is fun.

The games play very well. No emulation glitches as they games are running on essentially the original hardware they were written for. The sound out of the Game Prince’s speaker is good for what it is. The buttons are responsive.

I purchased my RS-1 Game Prince from AliExpress for $19. For that price it’s definitely worth it just as a bathroom diversion.

Other Thoughts

I’ve been fascinated with NES on a chip systems since the first ones shaped like a N64 controller started appearing around 2004.  Ben Heck turned one into a portable way back when.

The A and B buttons being reversed really seems like an unforgivable sin at first, but I got over it within a few minutes of playing.

Being cheap Chinese crap, the menus on the Game Prince are littered with grammar and translation issues. Prassing start to begin or playing Dongkey Kong always makes me smile.

Game Prince's poorly translated menu

The Woodi GBA and the Woodi GBA Micro are portable game consoles that do a fair job of replicating their Nintendo big brothers.

If you want to skip the reading, here is a video showing off both systems:

 

Woodi GBA
Woodi GBA

The Woodi GBA looks almost identical to a Nintendo Gameboy Advance. The biggest differences are a reset button above the B and A buttons and a micro USB port on the bottom right edge of the case. When you turn it on you’ll see that is has a back lit LED screen, much like a GBA SP or NDS. The screen is bright and looks really good. It has a rechargeable battery.  The battery lasts about five hours.

The Woodi GBA has 26 games built in. These games vary slightly based on the color of the Woodi GBA you buy. It has a cartridge slot for accepting other games. As near as I can tell the only game available is the Woodi 28-in-1 cartridge that came with it. Keeping count that is 26 games built in and 28 on the cartridge, a total of 54. The games are all from the Nintendo GBA. The cartridges and slot are very similar to the Nintendo GBA’s, but are not identical. Nintendo carts will not fit.

When I originally bought the Woodi GBA I was hoping it utilized a GBA on a chip. After playing the games I’m sure that it is actually emulating them. While the games normally play at full speed there are times when there are slow downs. The sound quality is what really makes me think the Woodi is emulating. The sound quality is bad, really bad. The sound plays slightly slower than it should.

I purchased my Woodi GBA for $32 on AliExpress. For that price it was worth it. It’s a nice system to keep in the can.

Woodi GBA Micro
Woodi GBA Micro

Pretty much everything I said about the Woodi GBA applies to the Woodi GBA Micro. There are a couple of exceptions to that: the micro uses three AAA batteries and it has no cartridge slot. The batteries last a seven hours or so. Opening up both systems, they have the same circuit board, just the screen, case, odds and ends are different.

The micro USB port is just for show. It doesn’t charge the system. Plugging it into a PC does nothing. Looking at the circuit board, it is not connected to anything.

The Woodi GBA Micro has 25 built in games. These games are all from the Nintendo GBA and the Nintendo NES. The NES games are definetly emulated. You can push the shoulder buttons at the same time to bring up a PocketNES menu while playing.

I purchased my Woodi GBA Micro from AliExpress for $30.

I like to travel with the Micro. It’s cheap enough that I’m not worried about losing or breaking it.

How do they play?

For being cheap Chinese crap, both systems feel reasonably well built. I’ve dropped my Micro a few times and it looks as good as new. The buttons on the Woodi GBA feel good, the buttons on the Micro feel oddly springy, but work well. Both systems are near identical to their Nintendo made counterparts so they both feel good in hand.

The game selection on both systems is very good. You really can’t go wrong with classic GBA games. The games play OK. I touched on the sound problems earlier. Both systems remind me of PC emulators from 7-8 years ago… the emulation isn’t quite accurate. You notice things like colors being off or the tone of a sound being just slightly weird. I know some people who would be driven nuts by this, for me though it isn’t a big deal.  The games are fun and the system plays them well enough that I’m able to enjoy it all. Normal game saves work, after three months of ownership it hasn’t lost one of my saves. There are no save states like you would find in emulators.

Would I choose the Woodi versions over the Nintendo originals? That’s a hard question to answer… on a purely price and utility standpoint, yes I would choose the Woodi systems. $30 gets you a backlit, rechargable, GBA Advance with 54 games (builtin even,  no carts to carry). I can overlook some wonky sound for that. As someone who grew up with Nintendo and could be considered a fan, no. These systems are bad and morally wrong.

Other Comments

AliExpress isn’t for the faint of heart. It took twenty-seven days from the time I ordered until I received my systems. The first time out both systems were broken, the seller promptly sent me another set, letting me keep the broken ones. The new systems arrived twenty-three days later in good shape. The whole process was just under two months.

The Woodi Micro using AAA batteries isn’t all that bad. I use rechargeable Ni-MH batteries.  They last a long time.

I was really curious whether the systems were emulated or GBAs on a chip. All of the chips on both systems are either covered in resin or have the identifiers scratched out.

On being cheap Chinese crap… the game lists are poorly translated. I get a kick out of Castle Asia of Sorrow every time I start it up. The USB charger the Woodi GBA comes with is identical to an iPhone charger. Short of missing the Apple branding there is no difference in the look.

Castle Asia of Sorrow

Update 1/21/2016

All of the problems mentioned in the review above started to get to me. What really put me over the edge was the video/audio/controller lag in some games. The fifth world in Kirby’s  Nightmare in Dreamland is all but unplayable between the wonky sound and control lag.

I purchased these systems because I thought the hardware would be interesting to play around with, the games were inconsequential. I found that I liked the games and played them a lot though, go figure. I ended up buying a Nintendo DS Lite. It’s backwards compatible with the GBA and of course plays NDS games too. The difference in quality between it and either of the Woodi systems in night and day. There is no aspect done better by the Woodi systems than the Nintendo DS.

Would I still recommend the Woodi systems? If you’ve got $30 to blow, yes. If nothing else they’re neat conversation pieces. If you’re interested in playing games start to finish, go with an actual GBA or a DS. My vote is for a DS since they are half the cost used as a GBA and can play DS games too. The hipsters have the GBA market messed up in my opinion,  it is overpriced.

The Amazon Fire TV can run NES, SNES, and GBA games. You can even use the included remote, though the game controller works much better.

I made up a package with a batch script that makes it pretty easy.

MyTechJam took it a big step further and made a video tutorial.

 

Here is how to play NES, SNES, and GBA games on your Amazon Fire TV.

Note: This does not require you to root your Fire TV. You will not lose access to the Amazon interface. Nothing will be removed or change. If in doubt look over the package you download and definitely look over all of the .bat files.

Enable USB Debugging and Find out the IP address of your Fire TV

This steps turns on the features that allow you to remotely install software on your Fire TV.

  1. From the Fire TV Home screen, select Settings
  2. Go to System -> Developer Options
  3. Select ADB Debugging to turn it ON
  4. Go to System -> About -> Network, and take note of the Fire TV’s IP address

(Thanks XBMC Wiki)

Download and Extract my Installer Package

Amazon Fire TV Emulator Package: Download

Once you have it downloaded, unzip it.

Install Emulators and Send Your ROMs to the Amazon Fire TV

Installing the emulators:

  1. Double click on INSTALL-EMULATORS.bat (in the installer package)
  2. When prompted, enter the IP of your Fire TV
  3. You should see the emulators install with a ‘Success’ message

Copying the ROMS:

There are folders for ROMs for each system in the installer package. Copy your ROMs into the folder appropriate for them. If your ROMs are zipped, unzip them. Make sure the NES ROMs have a .nes extension, SNES .smc, and GBA .gba.

To play GBA games you’ll need a GBA bios file. Put it in the ROMS-GBA folder.

Once you have everything in the appropriate folders, double click on INSTALL-ROMS.bat. When prompted, enter the IP of your Fire TV. You should see everything copy over.

If at some point in the future you want to add more ROMs to your Fire TV, just add them into the appropriate folder and double click on INSTALL-ROMS.bat again.

Launch Emulators and Configure 

You should now have your emulators and ROMs installed on the Fire TV. Unfortunately side loaded applications do not appear in the Home screen, you have to launch them via the Settings menu.

  1. From the Fire TV Home screen, select Settings
  2. Select Applications
  3. Find and select the emulator you want. (Nesoid, Snesoid, GameBoid)
  4. Select Launch Application

You will want to go into the settings for the emulator and map the buttons for the remote (or your controller) to the game buttons.

Where to go From Here?

If you’re only using the remote that came with the Fire TV you’ll want to get a real controller. The remote works OK for RPGs and games that don’t require twitchy actions. Amazon sells a very good controller made for the Fire TV. XBOX 360 and PS3 controllers work well too.

The emulators I’ve included are not the best out there. There are some really good commercial Android emulators out there, installing and using them makes for a better experience.

What Exactly does the Installer Package do?

The general idea is that it side loads the emulator’s apk files via winadb. The installer package (if you can call it that) contains a apks for the emulators, winadb, and a couple of .bat files. The .bat files launch winadb with the appropriate commands to connect to the Fire TV and install the emulators. You can easily modify the .bat files to allow you to install other emulators.

I’m fortunate enough to own a Nintendo 3DS, GCW Zero, and a Samsung Galaxy S3 Android smart phone. At one time or another I’ve used all three to emulate classic game consoles and play games. How do they compare to each other?

Hardware:

Out of the box the GCW Zero is ready to go. The Nintendo 3DS requires you to buy a $40 DSTWO flash cartridge. The S3 needs a Game Klip and a PS3 controller.

The 3DS has the biggest screen. It also has two screen, this is important for playing DS games.

The GCW Zero is the easiest to pocket. The 3DS is just a bit too big for a pocket, it does well in a backpack. The S3 by itself fits easily into a pocket, the Game Klip and PS3 controller not so much.

The S3 with a PS3 controller has the best controls of the bunch.

The GCW Zero has the best battery life, about eight hours for me. The 3DS around four and the S3 2-3. It’s difficult to judge the S3 since its hard to use it for nothing else than playing a game for 3+ hours.

NES, Gameboy, and Gameboy Color games: All three devices play these games equally well.

Super Nintendo and Genesis Games: GCW Zero and S3 can emulate these darn near perfectly. The GCW Zero has trouble with SuperFX games such as Star Fox. The 3DS has trouble running graphically intense games at full speed. It works well for RPGs or other games where fast responses are not needed.

Nintendo 64 and Playstation Games:  The S3 is the only one that can emulate these. It does pretty well.

Gameboy Advance Games: All three devices can emulate Gameboy Advance with near perfection.

Nintendo DS Games: The GCW Zero cannot emulate DS and even if it did it doesn’t have a touch screen. The S3 can emulate the DS very well, though its screen will be split into two in order to emulate the DS’ two screens. The 3DS can run DS games natively and perfectly.

Other Consoles: None of the three devices have fast enough hardware to emulate consoles beyond the Nintendo 64/Playstation era. The 3DS can natively play 3DS games though. Consoles older than the NES run well on all three.

What about native games? The S3 has the entire Google Play Store to pick from. The 3DS has the library of 3DS and DS games. The GCW has some not so great Linux games.

Using it for things other than games: Hands down the S3. Being a smart phone its all good. The 3DS has a limited web browser and can watch Youtube. The GCW just plays games.

Which one of the three do I use the most? I use my Nintendo 3DS the most. The screen size, battery life, controls, DS and 3DS game support make it my favorite of the bunch. Its the one I take if I’m going on a trip. The 16bit console support is a bummer but the 3DS and DS support more than make up for it.

 

Being able to run emulators on an OpenELEC computer can be tricky. It takes a fair bit of knowledge from several different areas to setup. I’m going to try to give a good overview of putting all together into a working system. By the end you’ll have a setup that allows you to play all of your old games from the comfort of your couch.

Something to consider, the build of RetroArch I’m using doesn’t have emulators for a lot of systems. Here is a list of what it can emulate.

I’m going to break this up into sections. I’m going to assume you have OpenELEC installed and working.

Getting ROMs on OpenELEC

Be sure to organize your ROMs into folders based on their console. EG: put your SNES ROMs in a snes folder, put your NES ROMs into a nes folder, and so on.

By far the easiest way to get ROMs onto your OpenELEC computer is to put them onto a flash drive and plug it in. Once plugged in use XBMC to add a new file source pointing to the flash drive.

Go to Settings and then File Manager

Go to Settings and then File Manager

Select Add Media and then Browse

Select Add Media and then Browse

Select Root File System then Media. Your drive will be one of the folder in there. Select it.

Select Root File System then Media. Your drive will be one of the folders in there. Select it.

Once you've selected your flash drive, click OK.

Once you’ve selected your flash drive, click OK.

The file source is now added and your ROMs are now easily accessible by OpenELEC/XBMC.

Getting RetroArch working on OpenELEC

Our hero and savoir, zaggash, has written a RetroArch addon for OpenELEC which makes installing all of the emulators a breeze. First thing we need to do is download a copy of the addon and install it on OpenELEC. Go to Zaggash’s site and download build appropriate for your computer.  For instance I use the Generic build. Take that file and put it on the flash drive from the previous step and then plug the flash drive back into your OpenELEC computer. Now we need to install it.

Go back to System, then select Addon Browser. From there select Install from Zip file. Navigate to the source we created in the previous step and install the emulator.retroarch ZIP file.

Now we need to add another file source that points to RetroArch. Go back to System->File Manager->Add Source->Browse. This time select Home Directory->.xbmc->addons->emulator.retroarch->bin. Call the new source Emulator Bin.

Getting ROM Collection Browser working on OpenELEC

ROM Collection Browser is also available as an addon. It gives you a nice menu in XBMC to launch your ROMS from. You can install it via addon manager without doing anything special.

Once installed start the addon. We’ll need to add your ROMs. Here is how I would do it for Game Boy Advance ROMs.

Start ROM Collection Browser. Hit the Menu button on your remote and select Add Rom Collection->Scrape game info and artwork online->Game Boy Advance. Now we need to select where RetroArch is, open your Emulator Bin source and select retroarch.sh.

Now it will ask you for any arguments RetroArch needs to start. Change it to: vba_next “%ROM%”

Note that vba_next is the core from RetroArch. If you’re adding different game systems the core name will change. See here for a complete list of cores: http://sourceforge.net/p/zaggxbmcaddons/wiki/Core%20List/

Once it is done scrapping the artwork for your games you should be able to launch them with the remote.

Getting a controller to work on OpenELEC

For me, this was the toughest part of the setup. I tried numerous controllers and spent a lot of time banging my head against the wall. In the end I settled on a corded SNES USB controller.

Wireless XBOX 360 controller: An XBOX 360 controller will actually work just by plugging it in, problem is that the drivers included with OpenELEC are not able to control the LED lights on the controller. Where as on an XBOX the lights will go solid in a spot to represent which player you are, on OpenELEC they continue to flash, forever. If you can deal with the flashing its all good. I’ve had thoughts of taking the controller apart and removing the LEDs.

PS3 Dual Shock 3 Sixaxis: I couldn’t get the controller to work either wired or in Bluetooth mode. In both cases the OS detects it as a HID device, but never as a joystick.

Random corded USB controllers: I’ve had good luck with my SNES USB, old Microsoft Sidewinder, and Logitech USB controllers. All of which only needed to be plugged in to work.

Once you’ve made a choice on controllers you have to let RetroArch know about it. You’ll need to SSH into your OpenELEC computer. The login is root and the password is openelec.

Once logged in:

cd .xbmc/addons/emulator.retroarch/bin/
./retroarch-joyconfig

From there follow the prompts to hit the buttons on your controller. If you don’t have a button it asks for, just hit any button. If says anything about not finding a joystick, you’re in trouble.

Once down you’ll get a bunch of lines mapping buttons to action, you’ll want to copy all of this and put it at the bottom of /storage/emulators/retroarch/config/retroarch.cfg

Also at the bottom of your retroarch.cfg file add:

input_enable_hotkey_btn = 6
input_exit_emulator_btn = 7

Replace 6 and 7 with numbers representing the buttons on your controller you want to hit that will exit a ROM you’re playing. On my controller 6 and 7 represent the Select and Start buttons.

… and that’s it. You should now be able to start Rom Collection Browser, find a game with the remote, start it, play it with a controller, then return to XBMC by hitting two buttons on the controller.

 

Galaxy S3 with Game Klip

I like playing old games. I missed out on the NDS, Game Boy Color, GBA, and the butt end of the SNES and Genesis. Playing games from those consoles is actually something new for me.

I’ve known about old console emulation on Android phones for a long time. I had an original Droid phone that ran NES games alright. Having to use the touch screen as a controller though makes playing the games frustrating. I’ve played around a bit with using a Wiimote as a controller but then you have to prop up the phone somehow so you can have both hands free to hold the controller, no fun either.

Jump cut to the GameKlip. The GameKlip is a bracket that fits around a PS3 Dual Shock 3 controller and attaches to your Android phone or tablet. You get a real controller to use with your games and you don’t have to try to balance your phone on your lap. The GameKlip is a great idea and I can’t say enough good things about it.

I currently have a Samsung Galaxy S3 running the stock android ROM that came with it. I have attempted to use other ROMs such at CyanogenMod and Slim Bean but they would cause the game emulators to crash after a bit of play. Very cause and effect. Flawless under the stock ROM, reboot into CyanogenMod, load the same quick save up, play for a few minutes, emulator locks up. Bummer.

How well does the Galaxy S3 emulate the different consoles?

PSX: Great! Surprising considering how other emulators perform. Using RetroArch.

N64: It’s hit and miss. Some games wont even load. Speed can be an issue. Mario Kart is sort of playable. Slower paced games like Ogre Battle work ok. I’m currently using MuPen64 Plus AE. I’ve tried several other emulators and its the best all things considered. If you mix and match emulators most anything will at least load. Playability not so much.

SNES: It works well. There can be slow downs in spots with lots of sprites moving around (Contra 3), but nothing that ruins it for you. I’m using SNES9x EX+

Genesis: The same as the SNES.

NDS: Works great. Trying to show both of the DS screens at once on the little S3 screen just makes me wish I had an Android tablet to run the emulators on. Using DrasStic.

GBA: Perfect. No complaints at all. I’m using My Boy!.

GBC/Gameboy: Perfect. I’m using GBC.emu.

NES: Perfect. I’m using John NES Lite.

What about sound lag?

I’ve read a lot about Android emulators having bad sound lag. For instance, you grab a coin in Mario and you don’t hear the sound for it until a second later. Judging from the amount of reports on the Internet I’ve seen it must be a real problem. I already had an Android phone and most of the emulators have free to try versions. I didn’t have any risk involved in trying it out. If I had to buy a phone (or even one of the Android handheld consoles or a tablet) and then hope that emulation works, I wouldn’t have done it. That’s how worrisome all of the lag reports are.

Luckily though I have not had any problems with sound lag in my setup. Is it just my phone? Maybe my combination of emulators, ROM, and Android version is good? Dunno. It just works right for me as is.

What about RetroArch?

Why use all of these other emulators? RetroArch is free and emulates every system!

RetroArch is a good concept. All of the emulators in one place, no questions about licenses, and free. Good times.

RetroArch is hit or miss though. For instance, PSX emulation under it is near perfect. GBC emulation suffers from horrible slow downs and choppy sound. Considering the specs of the two systems you would expect the opposite problem. Using different emulators tailored to a specific system works well for me.  I may have spent $15 total for all of them, but I get a lot of value back in return.